University Archives
Historical Information about UC Davis Campus Buildings

Ash Hall, Birch Hall, Cedar Hall (A-B-C Dormitories)

Completed: 1947
Materials: Wood frame
Cost: Ash Hall ($56,480) Birch Hall ($55,980) Cedar Hall ($55,980)
Financing: State appropriation
Architect: U.S. Army
History: These surplus war housing units, acquired from the federal government, were moved to campus to provide student housing. They were later razed.
University Archive image

Ash Hall, circa 1948.

University Archive image

Ash Hall, Birch Hall, and Cedar Hall, circa 1948.

Aggie Villa

Completed: 1948
Financing: State appropriation
Architect: U.S. Army
History: Aggie Villa, located south of First Street, was made up of war housing units that were acquired from the federal government. The units contained two and three bedroom apartments that provided housing for young families. The complex was razed in 1972.
University Archive image

Aggie Villa, circa 1954.

Asmundson Hall

Completed: 1954
Materials: Reinforced concrete
Cost: $1,391,006
Financing: State appropriation
Architect: Donald P. Smith
Dedication: Dedication: On June 23, 1970 the building was named in honor of Vigfus Asmundson (1895-1974), who served as Professor of Poultry Husbandry from 1933-1967.
History: Originally named the Poultry Husbandry Building, it was built for that department. It later housed the Avian Sciences and Plant Sciences Departments. As of 2014, it was home to the Plant Sciences Department
University Archive image

Asmundson Hall, circa 1954.

Bainer Hall

Completed: 1966
Materials: Reinforced and precast concrete
Cost: $3,198,000
Financing: State appropriation and Health Education Facilities Act
Architect: Dreyfuss & Blackford
Dedication: In 1969, the building was dedicated to Roy Bainer (1902-1990), who served as Professor of Agricultural Engineering from 1935-1969.
History: Bainer Hall has always been home to the College of Engineering.
University Archive image

Bainer Hall, undated.

The Barn

Completed: 1914
Materials: Wood frame
Architect: Cunningham & Politeo
History: Originally built to house beef cattle, this building was remodeled in 1968-1969 into office space for the Architects and Engineers Office. In 2004 the Architects and Engineers Office moved off campus. As of 2014, the building housed the John Muir Institute for the Environment and affiliated programs.
University Archive image

The Barn, circa 1986.

Bike Barn

Completed: 1916
Materials: Wood frame
Architect: Office of Architects & Engineers
History: Originally known as TB 24, the building was used as a judging pavilion. It was later occupied by the Bike Barn and Outdoor Adventures. In 2013, Outdoor Adventures moved to the Rec Pool Lodge.
University Archive image

Bike Barn, undated.

Briggs Hall

Completed: 1971
Dedication: Briggs Hall was dedicated on May 24, 1975 in honor of Fred N. Briggs (1896-1965), who served as Professor of Agronomy and Dean of the College of Agriculture.
History: The building has housed teaching facilities, research laboratories, and the departments of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior, and Entomology.
University Archive image

Briggs Hall, undated.

Carlson Health Sciences Library

Completed: 1976
Dedication: The Regents of the University of California in executive session on June 20, 1980, approved “that the Health Sciences Library, located in Building B of the Medical School Complex, Davis campus, be designated the Loren Daniel Carlson Health Sciences Library.” The renaming ceremony and dedication took place on December 12, 1984. Loren D. Carlson (1915-1972) came to the medical school at Davis in 1966 as assistant dean and chairman of the division of sciences basic to medicine, a post he held concurrently with the chairmanship of the Department of Human Physiology.
History: The beginnings of the Carlson Health Sciences Library date to 1956 when the Veterinary Medicine Library was established in a room next to the Dean’s Office in Haring Hall. The Veterinary Medicine Library became the Health Sciences Library (HSL) in 1966 with the founding of the School of Medicine. (The Medical Center Library was established in 1970 at the UC Davis Medical Center.) In 1967, the HSL moved from its original location in Haring Hall to Surge II. A decade later in 1977, the HSL opened in its current location in Medical Sciences 1B.
University Archive image

Health Sciences Library, 1979 June.

Chemistry Building

Completed: 1965
Materials: Cast in place and precast reinforced concrete
Cost: $3,647,000
Financing: State appropriation
Architect: John Funk
History: Originally known as Physical Sciences II, this building has always housed the Chemistry Department.
University Archive image

Chemistry Building, undated.

Cowell Student Health Center

Completed: 1952
Materials: Concrete and plaster
Cost: $623,700
Financing: State appropriation
Architect: John Funk
Dedication: On May 7, 1967 the center was dedicated to the Cowell Family who had a lime mining and ranching enterprise in Santa Cruz, California.
History: In 1973, the building was named the Cowell Hospital and Student Health Center. The hospital section closed in 1987. The building served as the Student Health Center until 2010 when a new facility was built. As of 2014, it was home to Occupational Health Services.
University Archive image

Cowell Student Health Center, dedication ceremony, 1967.

Cowell Student Health Center Addition

Completed: 1966
Cost: $563,782
Financing: Cowell Foundation funds
Architect: John Funk

Cruess Hall

Completed: 1952
Materials: Concrete
Cost: $645,662
Financing: State appropriation
Architect: Herbert E. Goodpastor
Dedication: On March 19, 1960 the building was named for William Vere Cruess (1886-1968) who served as Professor of Food Technology at UC Berkeley.
History: Located on California Avenue, this building was constructed specifically for the Food Science and Technology Department. A 1966 addition, built at a cost of $236,373, was designed by Cox, Liske & Associates. In 2010, the Food Science and Technology Department moved to the Robert Mondavi Institute for Wine and Food Science. As of 2014, the building housed the Design Department and the Design Museum.
University Archive image

Serving as a laboratory and classroom for instruction of students in semi-commercial operations, and practical application of research, the Food Technology Building of the University of California, College of Agriculture on the Davis campus is designed to give the best in educational and research facilities. The building contains cold storage laboratories, teaching laboratories, a tropical incubator room, several small utility laboratories, food preparation labs and kitchens, food tasting and acceptance labs, and a pilot wing where research under simulated commercial conditions can be conducted. The wing ultimately will be outfitted with machinery and equipment for duplicating any process used by the food industry. The cold storage and incubator rooms enable technologists to observe the effects of fresh and processed foods under long and short term storage at greatly varied conditions. The incubator room will also be used for culturing yeasts, bacteria and viruses for experimental work, undated.

Dutton Hall

Completed: 1998
Cost: $9.8 million
Architect: Ficher and Freidman Associates
Dedication: On October 15, 1999 the building was dedicated to Thomas B. Dutton, Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs from 1970-1991.
History: Located on the site formerly occupied by East Hall, this building was built to bring together student services including Financial Aid, Student Aid Accounting, Cashier’s Office, Learning Skills Center, State Employment Center, Outreach Services, and Student Judicial Affairs. As of 2014, the offices located in the building include: the Cashier’s Office, Early Academic Outreach Program, Educational Talent Search, Financial Aid, Mathematics Diagnostic Testing Project, Student Academic Success Center, Student Accounting, Student Employment Center, Student Judicial Affairs, Transfer Reentry Veterans Center, Undergraduate and Prestigious Scholarship Office, and Upward Bound.

East Hall

Completed: 1909
Materials: Wood frame
Cost: $13,136
Financing: State appropriation
Architect: Cunningham & Politeo
History: East Hall was built in two parts—the first was a dining hall and the second was the infirmary. The dining hall was later was remodeled into the first campus theater. In 1936, the building was moved from its original location to the present day site of Dutton Hall. Before it was deemed unsafe and vacated in June 1973, the building was home to the CoffeeHouse and several student activities offices. It was razed in1974.
University Archive image

East Hall, circa 1918

Enology Lab

Completed: 1939
Materials: Wood, concrete, and stucco
Cost: $73,630
Financing: State appropriation
Architect: William C. Hays
History: The building was built and continuously used for the study and teaching of winemaking. Brandy was also made in the building with the tower used as a brandy still. The Viticulture and Enology Department moved to the Robert Mondavi Institute for Wine and Food Science in 2010.
University Archive image

Enology Lab, undated.

Everson Hall

Completed: 1952
Materials: Concrete
Cost: $846,729
Financing: State appropriation
Architect: Clark & Buettler
Dedication: In 1970 the building was dedicated to Gladys J. Everson (1909-1969), who served as Professor of Home Economics from 1953-1967.
History: Originally named the Home Economics Building, it initially housed that department. It later housed offices and laboratories for the departments of Textiles and Clothing and Civil and Environmental Engineering. As of 2014, the building is home to the Art History Department, the Textiles and Clothing Program, and the Mathematics and Science and Teaching Program (MAST).
University Archive image

Some of the nearly 1,200 visitors to the public dedication, Tuesday, March 31, of the new Home Economics Building on the Davis campus are seen here at the tea following the formal ceremony. The Social Living Room is through the large doors. This south-facing exposure of the "L" shaped structure has permanent exterior shades to protect the offices and laboratories from the summer sun. To the left of the Social Living Room are decorative arts laboratories and storage facilities. On the upper floor are the clothing and textiles laboratories, the home management "fatigue laboratory" and staff offices, 1953.

First Administration Office Building (Educational Opportunity Program Office in 2014)

Completed: 1914
Materials: Wood frame
Cost: $2681
Financing: State appropriation
Architect: Cunningham & Politeo
History: This building was first used as an administration office building and later as a business office, student store, and the comptroller's office. It was used as a student store, bookstore, and coffee shop until 1955 when these services were moved to the Memorial Union. It was then occupied by the Cooperative Extension Office until 1992. From 1992-2000 the Cross Cultural Center was housed in this building. In 2012, the Cross Cultural Center relocated to the Student Community Center and the Educational Opportunity Program Office moved to this building.
University Archive image

First administration office building, undated.

Haring Hall

Completed: 1949
Materials: Concrete
Cost: $2,955,651
Financing: State appropriation
Architect: Blanchard & Maher
Dedication: The structure was named in 1953 in honor of Clarence M. Haring (1878-1951). He was the primary organizer of the School of Veterinary Medicine and served as dean from 1947-1948.
History: The division of Veterinary Science moved from the Animal Sciences Building (now Hart Hall) to Haring Hall upon its completion. When the Vet Med 3B building opened in 2013, it provided replacement space for Veterinary Medicine laboratories and offices previously located in Haring Hall.
University Archive image

Haring Hall, undated.

Hart Hall

Completed: 1928
Materials: Reinforced concrete
Cost: $256,879
Financing: State appropriation
Architect: William C. Hays
Dedication: The building was renamed George Hart Hall in 1983. Hart’s career at the University of California began in 1917 when he joined the faculty at Berkeley as Professor of Veterinary Science. He came to Davis in 1926 as Professor of Animal Husbandry and Chairman of the Department, a position he held until 1948, when he became Dean of the School of Veterinary Medicine. He retired in 1954.
History: When the Animal Science Building was completed in 1928, it housed the Animal Husbandry Department as well as the divisions of Veterinary Science, Entomology, and Zoology. In 1949, Veterinary Science moved to the new Haring Hall. Entomology stayed in the building until 1948-1949 and Zoology until 1969. In 1986, Hart Hall was listed in the National Register of Historic Places. In 1987, the Animal Sciences Department moved to the new Meyer Hall and Hart Hall underwent a renovation which was completed in 1992. As of 2014, the building housed the following the following departments, programs, and organizations: African American and African Studies, American Studies, Asian American Studies, Center for Transnational Health, Chicana/o Studies, C.N. Gorman Museum, Cultural Studies, Human & Community Development, Native American Studies, and Women Studies.
University Archive image

Animal Sciences Building (Hart Hall), circa 1952

Heitman Staff Learning Center

Completed: 1913
Materials: Wood frame
Cost: $5,356
Financing: State appropriation
Architect: Cunningham & Politeo
Dedication: The center was dedicated in May 2009 in honor of Hubert Heitman Jr. (1917–1993), Professor of Animal Husbandry.
History: Originally known as the Hog Barn, it closed in 2002 when the swine program moved to a new facility west of Highway 113. In 2004, the barn was moved from its previous location beside the Crocker Laboratory to the Silo complex. The building then underwent a $1.5 million remodel and became the home of Human Resources Staff Development and Professional Services unit.
University Archive image

Hog barn, undated.

Hickey Gymnasium

Completed: 1938
Materials: Concrete
Cost: $299,655
Financing: State appropriation
Architect: William C. Hays
Dedication: On May 20, 1972 the building was named for Vernard B. Hickey (1900-1988). Hickey served as Football Coach from 1937-1948 and Athletic Director from 1961 until his retirement in 1967. He also coached baseball, basketball, water polo, swimming, and golf.
History: Originally called the Physical Education Building, the structure replaced the old Recreation Hall and provided the campus with the first swimming pool. Basketball games were held here until the new Recreation Hall was built in 1977. As of 2014, the building is home to Intercollegiate Athletics as well as the Physical Education and the Military Science Departments.
University Archive image

Hickey Gymnasium, undated.

Hickey Gymnasium Addition

Completed: 1963
Materials: Tilt up concrete
Cost: $857,876
Financing: State appropriation
Architect: Barovetto & Thomas

Hoagland Hall

Completed: 1959
Materials: Reinforced concrete
Cost: $1,691,668
Financing: State appropriation
Architect: Barovetto & Thomas
Dedication: On January 30, 1960, the hall was named for Dennis Robert Hoagland (1884-1949), Professor of Plant Nutrition at UC Berkeley.
History: Originally used by the Soils and Plant Nutrition Departments, as of 2014, the building housed the Analytical Laboratory, Atmospheric Science, Safety Services, and classrooms for Staff Development and Professional Services.
University Archive image

Hoagland Hall, 1979.

Hunt Hall

Completed: 1949
Materials: Reinforced concrete
Cost: $1,454,716
Financing: State appropriation
Architect: Elkbridge T. Spenser
Dedication: The building was dedicated on March 22, 1949 to Thomas Forsyth Hunt (1862-1927). Hunt served as Professor of Agriculture at the University of California, Berkeley and Dean of the College of Agriculture (now the UC Davis).
History: Hunt Hall, which contains a 200 seat lecture hall, previously housed the Department of Agronomy and Range Sciences. As of 2014, it was home to the Agricultural Issues Center, Environmental Design and Landscape Architecture, Global Livestock CRSP, Human Ecology, and the Center for Biophotonics Science and Technology
University Archive image

Hunt Hall, undated.

Hutchison Hall

Completed: 1963
Materials: Reinforced concrete
Cost: $3,385,249
Financing: State appropriation and a federal grant
Architect: Anderson, Simonds, Dusel & Campini
Dedication: This building was dedicated to Claude B. Hutchison (1885-1980) who served as Professor of Agriculture (1922-1952); Dean of the College of Agriculture (1922-1925); and Vice President, University of California (Systemwide) (1945-1952).
History: In 2000, the building housed the Microbiology, Nematology, and Plant Pathology Departments as well as the Center for Engineering Plants for Resistance Against Pathogens (CEPRAP) and the Facility for Advanced Instrumentation. As of 2014, it housed the Entomology and Nematology and Plant Pathology Departments as well as the Science and Society Program.
University Archive image

Hutchison Hall, undated.

Kerr Hall

Completed: 1969
Dedication: On November 25, 1973 the building was dedicated to Clark Kerr (1911-2003), who served as President of the University of California from 1958-1967.
History: In 2000, the building was home to the Mathematics Division, the Division of Statistics, the Davis Honors Program, the Education Abroad Program, and the John Muir Institute of the Environment (JMIE). As of 2014, the Communication, Linguistics, and Political Science Departments as well as the International Relations Program were located in Kerr Hall.
University Archive image

Kerr Hall, undated.

King Hall

Completed: 1968
Materials: Concrete and brick
Dedication: On April 12, 1969, the building was dedicated to Martin Luther King, Jr. (1929-1968).
History: King Hall has always been home to the School of Law. A lower level was built in 1976. An 18,000 square foot wing was added to the building as part of an expansion project completed in 2010. A renovation project followed the 2010 expansion.
University Archive image

King Hall, undated.

Kleiber Hall

Dedication: In 1972, this lecture hall was dedicated to Max Kleiber (1893-1976), Professor of Animal Physiology from 1929-1960.
History: This building has always served as a lecture hall.
University Archive image

Kleiber Hall, 1979.

Mann Laboratory

Completed: 1965
Materials: Concrete
Cost: $673,642
Financing: State appropriation and the National Science Foundation
Architect: Cox, Liske & Assoc. & Edw. Simonds
Dedication: On March 22, 1967 the laboratory was dedicated to Louis K. Mann (1915-1964), an Oleculturist in the Experiment Station.
History: Originally known as the Vegetable Crops Controlled Temperature Facilities, the building was constructed as an interdepartmental plant growth laboratory used for research in postharvest physiology of vegetables.

Mrak Hall

Completed: 1966
Materials: Reinforced concrete
Cost: $1,984,743
Financing: State appropriation
Architect: Gardner A. Dailey
Dedication: In July 1969, the building was named for Emil Mrak. Mrak (1901-1987) served as Professor and Chairman of the Food Science and Technology Department at UC Davis from 1951-1959 and Chancellor of the campus from 1959-1969.
History: Originally named the Administration Building, this was the first major building constructed to house the campus administration exclusively. Prior to the completion of this building, the Chancellor’s Office was located in University House. In 2014, Mrak Hall housed the following offices: Academic Affairs, Academic Federation, Academic Senate, Administrative and Resource Management, Admissions, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Budget and Institutional Analysis, Campus Community Relations, Campus Counsel, Capital Resource Management, Chancellor, Graduate Studies, Provost, Strategic Communications, University Outreach & International Programs, and University Registrar.
University Archive image

Administration Building (Mrak Hall), circa 1968

Olson Hall

Completed: 1963
Materials: Precast concrete
Cost: Built with Sproul Hall at a cost of $2,153,155
Financing: State appropriation
Architect: Gardner, Dailey & Associates
Dedication: In 1964, the building was named for Gus Olson (1888-1970), who served as a UC Regent from 1951-1960.
History: As of 2014, the building housed classrooms and computer laboratories as well as the Language Learning Center.
University Archive image

Olson Hall, circa 1964.

Recreation Pool Lodge

Completed: 1964
Materials: Wood frame
Cost: $38,000
Financing: University funds
Architect: Harry Nyland
History: Built as a multipurpose building for campus activities, it often hosted meetings and conferences. In 2013, Outdoor Adventures moved to the lodge.
University Archive image

Recreation Pool Lodge, circa 1968.

Regan Halls

Completed: 1965
Materials: Wood and stucco
Cost: $1,529,600
Financing: University funds and a federal loan
Architect: Kitchen & Hunt, J. Funk
Dedication: This residence area was named for William M. Regan (1884-1962) and Susan Regan (1895-1962). William Regan served as Professor of Animal Husbandry from 1922-1951 and his wife Susan Regan served as Dean of Women from 1955-1962.
History: Regan Hall, which consisted of nine buildings (seven were dormitories), represented the first use of a small apartment house-type cluster on campus. The seven dormitories were later named: Campo, Indio, Nova, Paloma, Rienda, Sereno, and Talara.
University Archive image

Regan Halls, circa 1965.

Roadhouse Hall

Completed: 1922
Materials: Masonry and stucco
Cost: $214,036
Financing: State appropriation
Architect: William C. Hays
Dedication: On October 26, 1963, the building was dedicated to Chester L. Roadhouse (1881-1969) who served as Professor of Dairy Industry from 1917-1951.
History: Originally named the Dairy Industry Building, it was built on the corner of First and A Streets. It was deemed seismically unfit and razed in 1974.
University Archive image

Roadhouse Hall (Dairy Industry Building), 1963.

Robbins Hall

Completed: 1960
Materials: Reinforced concrete
Cost: $2,109,807
Financing: State appropriation
Architect: Anderson, Simonds, Dusel & Campini
Dedication: The building was dedicated to Wilfred Robbins (1884-1952), Professor of Botany from 1922-1951.
History: Previously the building housed the departments of Nematology, Weed Science, and Vegetable Crops with laboratory space for Plant Pathology and teaching laboratories for Plant Biology. As of 2014, the building is home to portions of the Plant Pathology Department, the Plant Transformation Facility, and offices of the Agricultural Sustainability Institute.
University Archive image

Robbins Hall, 1960.

Sewage treatment plant

Completed: 1951
Materials: Reinforced concrete
Cost: $767,500
Financing: State appropriation
Architect: Kennedy Engineers
History: In 2000, this facility was replaced by a new wastewater treatment plant which is located south of I-80.
University Archive image

Grouped in the background -- left to right -- Pumphouse, covered walk-way, office and laboratory, control room (directly in back of office), two sludge digestors, and the refuse disposal unit, with vacuum sludge filters. Directly in front of this building group, right to left, are the primary, secondary, and final sedimentation filters. The two circular structures in the foreground are trickling filters, and at the extreme left foreground is the million gallon final effluent reservoir. Paving of paths, roads, and walks, also landscaping and a mesh wire fence completely surrounding the plant have not yet been completed, 1950.

South Hall

Completed: 1912
Materials: Wood Frame
Cost: $35,032
Financing: State appropriation
Architect: Cunningham & Politeo
History: The building was constructed as a dormitory to house sixty-seven men. It remained a dormitory until 1961 when it was converted to office use. Over the years the building has housed the Advisory Skills Center, Learning Skills Center, Internship and Career Placement Center, Services for International Students and Scholars, Student Activities, Student Affairs Research and Information, and the Student Employment Center. As of 2014, the building contained offices for the following units and programs: Academic Peer Advising, Educational Placement, Graduate Letter Service, Health Sciences Advising, Internship and Career Center, Peace Corps, Pre-Graduate Advising, Pre-Health Advising, Tipsy Taxi, UC Davis Washington Program, and Unitrans.
University Archive image

South Hall, 1957.

Sproul Hall

Completed: 1963
Materials: Precast concrete
Cost: Built with Olson Hall at a cost of $2,153,155
Financing: State appropriation
Architect: Gardner Dailey & Associates
Dedication: Named for Robert Gordon Sproul (1891-1975) who served as President of the University of California from 1930-1958.
History: A seismic improvement of the building was completed in 1992. In 2000, the building was home to the following departments: Religious Studies, Comparative Literature, Linguistics, and Foreign Languages (Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, and Spanish). As of 2014, the building contains the following departments and programs: Classics, Comparative Literature, Critical Theory Program, East Asian Languages and Cultures, French and Italian, German, Humanities Program, Italian, Religious Studies, Russian, Spanish and Portuguese.
University Archive image

Sproul Hall, undated.

Storer Hall

Completed: 1968
Dedication: The building was dedicated in 1969 to Tracy I. Storer (1889-1973), Professor of Zoology from 1923-1956.
History: The building, which was built for the Zoology Department, housed the Department of Evolution and Ecology (formerly Zoology) as well as the Center for Population Biology in 2014.
University Archive image

Storer Hall, 1979.

Veihmeyer Hall

Completed: 1959
Materials: Reinforced concrete
Cost: $944,982
Financing: State appropriation
Architect: Gardner Dailey & Associates
Dedication: in 1962, the building was dedicated to Frank J. Veihmeyer (1886-1977), Professor of Water Science from 1918-1954.
History: Previously home to the Hydraulic Sciences Department, as of 2014 the building housed the Land, Air, and Water Resources Department as well as the Center for Spatial Technologies and Remote Sensing (CSTARS).
University Archive image

Voorhies Hall

Completed: 1959
Materials: Reinforced concrete
Cost: $944,982
Financing: State appropriation
Architect: Gardner Dailey & Associates
Dedication: In 1965, the building was dedicated to Edwin C. Voorhies (1892-1967), who served as Professor of Agricultural Economics, University of California (1925-1958).
History: Voorhies Hall has previously housed the Departments of Agricultural Economics, History, Political Science, and the Graduate School of Administration (now Graduate School of Management). As of 2014 the building was home to the English Department, the Humanities Institute, the Medieval and Early Modern Studies Program, and the University Writing Program
University Archive image

Voorhies Hall, undated.

Walker Hall

Completed: 1927
Materials: Steel frame, reinforced concrete
Cost: $136,704
Financing: State appropriation
Architect: William C. Hays
Dedication: In 1959 the building was dedicated to Harry B. Walker (1884-1957), who served as Professor of Agricultural Engineering from 1928-1951.
History: Walker Hall served as the original agricultural engineering building on campus. It was later used by the departments of Applied Science, Environmental Design, and the Design Museum.
University Archive image

Walker Hall, circa 1928.

Walker Annex

Completed: 1929
Materials: Masonry
Cost: $7,286
Financing: State appropriation
Architect: William C. Hays
History: The annex was a single story addition that was separated from the wings of the original building by approximately sixty feet and joined by a wall at each end to form a service court. It was built for equipment storage and maintenance and was later used by the Audiovisual and Nutrition Departments. The Walker Hall Annex was razed in 2011.
University Archive image

Walker Hall Annex, circa 1986.

Wyatt Pavilion Theater

Completed: 1907
Materials: Wood frame
Cost: $7,920
Financing: State appropriation
Architect: Howard & Galloway
Dedication: The building was dedicated to Fred S. Wyatt (1890-1974) whose monetary donation made the movement of the building and its renovation possible. From 1961-1974, Wyatt served as assistant to the Chancellor of UC Davis as a volunteer gifts and endowments officer.
History: Wyatt Pavilion is the oldest building on campus. This “Stick and Shingle” style building, built in 1907 on what is now the southeast corner of Shields Avenue and East Quad, was first used as the livestock judging barn and an all-purpose meeting place. In the 1930s it was moved to the corner of California Avenue and Hutchison Drive (the present day site of Rock Hall). In 1963, it was moved to Old Davis Road and remodeled and converted into an Elizabethan Theatre. William Shakespeare’s King Richard II was the inaugural performance in the new theatre in December 1963. As of 2014, the theatre, which is still located on Old Davis Road, seats 200 people in a three quarter round fashion. It is used by the Music and Theatre and Dance Departments for performances.
University Archive image

Wyatt Pavilion, Chancellor Mrak, right, and Alan Stambusky, left, discuss the conversion of the judging pavilion to a theatre, 1963.

Young Hall

Completed: 1941
Materials: Concrete
Cost: 195,961
Financing: State appropriation
Architect: Masten & Hurd
Dedication: In 1967, it was named for Herbert A. Young, Professor of Chemistry and first Dean of the College of Letters and Sciences.
History: Originally known as Physical Sciences I, it was built to house the Chemistry Department and later expanded to include Physics and Geology. In 1986, it was home to the Sociology, Anthropology, and Psychology Departments. As 2014, Young Hall contained the Anthropology and Psychology Departments.
University Archive image

Young Hall, undated.

Young Hall Addition

Completed: 1962
Materials: Reinforced concrete
Cost: $1,527,401
Architect: Barovetto & Thomas

Information compiled by Sara Gunasekara from the following sources:

  • Centennial Record of the University of California. [Berkeley, Calif.] University of California, [1967].
  • Dateline UCD: a Newspaper for Faculty and Staff of the University of California, Davis. [Davis, CA]: The University, 1987-.
  • Scheuring, Ann Foley. Abundant Harvest: the History of the University of California, Davis. [Davis, Calif.]: UC Davis History Project, c2001.
  • Spectator. Davis, Calif.: University of California, Davis, 1970-1988.
  • Windows on the Past: A Personal History of Campus Buildings, University of California, Davis. Davis, Calif. (Box 197, University of California, Davis, Davis, Calif. 95616) : The Pyrtanean Honor Society, Student Activities, c2000.